Programme Code : PGDT
Course Code : PGDT-01
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Year : 2013 Views: 832 Submitted By : Swaleha khatoon On 27th September, 2013

Do you have solution for this Question. If yes    I aslo want solution.

Q.


Translate it to hindi



Trains are my childhood fascination. In Mullurkara, a somenolent F-ffET) and

ravishingly verdant (AIT.rltT) hammlet on the banks of Bharathapuzha in central

Kerala, where I spent all of my childhood, existed an old but modest railway station.

Only a few passenger shuttle trains bothered to stop there for the benefit of a small

group of regulars. Long distance express trains came from a stellar distance and

5X2=10

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passed by furiously, raising a storm of dust. The coal-fired locomotive continuously

spitting mouthfuls of smoke.

As I grew up trains became a source of philosophical inspiration for me. I always felt

tbat i long irain journey to an unknown destination broadly corresponds with one's

life. Plenty of small unknown stations, a few clamorous junctions on the way and you

come across so many people on platforms and make short acquaintance with them'

But as the train leaves the platform, most of them fade into oblivion. A few others

travel with you till their respective destinations just like in the course of life.

When I first came to Mumbai in the mid-eighties trains ceased to fascinate me"

Thanks to the overcrowded suburban trains, popularly known as locals. They looked

like gigantic centipedes in stark contrast to my dream trains and stuffed thousands of

city;mmuters

-breathless

while shutting up and down with some kind of

metropolitan fury.

Inside the locals, commuters were arrested by sweating arm and sentenced to smelling

foul armpits. The regular pan-chewing commuters played cards, throwing themselves

around merrily. enO tating occasional breaks to spray the windows with blood-red

spit" The upwardly mobile among the crowd shouted on their celltels ruthlessly' Not

far off the tracks, people sat in a row for the morning rituals'

During Holi, you could become the target of a vicious balloon filled with gutter water.

Once in a while, those living by the tracks took sadistic pleasure in throwing stones at

the commuters.

So, my childhood dreams lost much of their romantic appeal in Mumbai.

q)

I am profoundly aware of the presence of both my peers and superiors, in the past, as

well as in my own generation who have made me what I am, and kept me afloat and

visible" Hence, I accept this honour with humility. for it is no small matter to be

admitted to the community of great Indian writers who have received Jnanpith before

me.

I write in Kannada which has a living literary tradition of at least 1000 years' No

writer in my language, either in the past or present, has ever had any doubt about

being a writer inihe mainstream of Indian writing. When I was initiated into reading

u, u-"hild, the first poem that moved me to tears situated Kamataka in the centre of

the globe itself. This is a song about a cow which by its truthfulness and honesty

ou.rio*., the cruel heart of a tiger. The anonymous poem is truly a Gandhian poem

of change of heart. For this unkown poet, the centre of the globe is Kamataka, and in

such a country there is a cowherd, and the cowherd's name is Kalinga. Thus the poem

moves from a long-short to a close-up on the cowherd, and the cows that he summons

are named after thi great rivers of India. When I was taught this poem, we used to live

in the midst of the deep forest of the Sahyadri mountain range of Karnataka. Thus I

came to know the rivers of India through the cows of this poem. I have never seen my

father shed tears except when he taught me this poem as he came to the crucial

passage here the mother cow takes leave of her calf, and present herself as food to the

tiger in fulfillment of her earlier promise'

t4

r)

It is a great thing to take pride in our work. Any thing that is worth doing at all is

worth doing well" Even the humblest task we should be ambitious to do it as well as

we can, if possible better than anlthing else. For example, a cobbler should not think

that becauie his job is a humble one, it can be scamped and done anyhow, he should

be determined to make better shoes than any other cobbler.

The world victory is generally associated in our minds with war, and calls up visions

of battles, bloodshed and conquest by force, and we think of war as a glorious thing

because of its famous victories and splendid triumphs. But when we think of the

achievements of great man - statesman, scholars, social reformers, scientists,

philanthropists, explorers, discoverers and honest workers ---for the betterment of the

Lrman race and progress and civilization of the world, we realise that the victories of

peace are even more of glorious than the victories of war "

A Greek sculptor, when he was asked why he carved the backs of his statues, which

no man would ever see, as carefully as he carved the front, said "The gods will see

them". So it is not enough for us to live outwardly good lives while in secret we allow

evil in our hearts, for God knows even if men do not. We should never do in secret

what we should be ashamed of doing in presence of our most valued friends"


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